Daily Border Bulletin: Our non-existent immigration problem, The Arizona Immigration Law is Beside the Point, How the Taco Gained in Translation

Tim Noah of The New Republic provides analysis on our non-existent national immigration problem. An editorial notes that despite the fact that the Supreme Court is likely to uphold the most pernicious sections of SB1070, the real fight is just beginning. A Mexican American fast food expert gives a history lesson on how food from Mexico immigrated to the U.S. mainstream.

Our non-existent immigration problem Tim Noah of The New Republic provides analysis on our non-existent national immigration problem. “I hate to interrupt a good brawl. But, while politicians and Supreme Court justices debate how, and at what level of government, to halt the national crisis of illegal immigration, it might be worth considering whether the crisis has, um, passed. The Pew Hispanic Center recently issued a report stating, “[T]he net migration flow from Mexico to the United States has stopped and may have reversed.” The report got some pickup in the press but not nearly as much as you might think. When we talk about immigration, we are talking often about Mexico, because it accounts for the largest proportion (30 percent) of America’s 40 million immigrants. (China places a distant second with 5 percent.) And, when we talk about illegal immigration, we are talking mostly about Mexico, because it supplies fully 59 percent of America’s estimated 11.5 million undocumented immigrants. (Here, El Salvador places an even-more distant second with 6 percent.) Most of the Mexicans who migrated to the United States during the past four decades arrived here illegally (though many subsequently acquired legal status).”

The Arizona Immigration Law is Beside the Point An editorial notes that despite the fact that the Supreme Court is likely to uphold the most pernicious sections of SB1070, the real fight is just beginning. “When it comes to immigrants’ rights, the outcome of Arizona v. United States is less important than you think. The case, heard in the Supreme Court last week by eight of the Justices (Justice Elena Kagan recused herself, presumably because she worked on the case as Solicitor General), concerns the constitutionality of SB 1070, an Arizona immigration law. The law has a number of controversial provisions, including a so-called “papers please” section which mandates that law enforcement determine whether an arrested alien “is in compliance with” federal registration laws that technically criminalize those adults who do not “carry…and have in his personal possession any certificate of alien registration or alien registration receipt card issued to him.” SB 1070 also gives a law enforcement officer the explicit right to, “without a warrant…arrest a person if the officer has probable cause to believe that the person has committed any public offense that makes the person removable from the United States.” Arizona argued last week that the state is within its rights to enforce federal law as it interprets that law, whereas the United States urged that Arizona’s construction of its own immigration policy goes against the federal “supremacy” on such matters.”

How the Taco Gained in Translation Mexican American fast food expert gives a history lesson on how food from Mexico immigrated to the U.S. mainstream.  “ADMIT it, tortilla-chip fans: you are curious about Taco Bell Doritos Locos tacos, introduced in March. These salt bombs take the usual fast-food taco filling and stuff them inside a giant orange-dusted nacho-cheese chip. They have been so successful that the company has just introduced a Cool Ranch flavor. But to truly grasp the significance of these creations, the taco must be eaten in the company of Gustavo Arellano, a journalist and Orange County, Calif., native who is perhaps the greatest (and only) living scholar of Mexican-American fast food. And preferably, you will eat it here, in the birthplace of American fast food, while he explains to you precisely how the Frito, America’s first corn chip, was copied from the Mexican tostado, then evolved into the Dorito and eventually the Tostito.”

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