Daily Border Bulletin – Arizona Businesses Brace for Pain Over Immigration Ruling, ATF Releases Government of Mexico Firearms Trace Data, 5 Takeaways from the Immigration Argument at the Supreme Court

With The Supreme Court likely to uphold parts of Arizona’s state passed immigration law, local businesses are already bracing for the worst. The ATF has released its latest report on Mexico Firearms trace data and the results confirm that cartel violence is mostly done with American firearms.  Finally Andrew Cohen of the Atlantic outlines his main takeaways from the opening remarks at the Supreme Court.

Arizona Businesses Brace for Pain Over Immigration Ruling: With The Supreme Court likely to uphold parts of Arizona’s state passed immigration law, local businesses are already bracing for the worst. “As several dozen workers weed his fields hugging Arizona’s border with Mexico, farmer Tim Dunn worries how he’ll augment his workforce if the U.S. Supreme Court upholds parts of the state’s immigration law. In hearing arguments this week, justices signaled they might be prepared to uphold the core of Arizona’s crackdown on illegal immigrants — known as S.B. 1070 — that requires police officers to check the immigration status of anyone they suspect is in the U.S. illegally. Lower courts blocked the provision from taking effect. At Dunn’s 1,500-acre Yuma farm, where workers are preparing to pick broccoli and cauliflower seed crops, that prospect is a threat to his plans for growth, he said.“As the economy improves, it will be harder and harder to get the labor we need,” Dunn said. “1070 has stopped the debate as far as what we really need: a way for people to come here to work legally.””

ATF Releases Government of Mexico Firearms Trace Data: The ATF has released its latest report on Mexico Firearms trace data and the results confirm that cartel violence is mostly done with American firearms. ” Trace information shows that between calendar years 2007 and 2011 the Government of Mexico recovered and submitted more than 99,000 firearms to ATF for tracing. Of those firearms more than 68,000 were U.S.-sourced. More complete information will be available on the ATF website. U.S.-sourced firearms are guns determined by ATF to be manufactured in the United States or legally imported into the United States by a federal firearms licensee. Since 2007, trace data shows a trend in recovered and submitted crime guns from Mexico shifting from pistols and revolvers to rifles.”

5 Takeaways from the Immigration Argument at the Supreme Court: Finally Andrew Cohen of the Atlantic outlines his main takeaways from the opening remarks at the Supreme Court. “Does Obama need a new lawyer, someone asked me Wednesday following oral argument in the Arizona immigration case, or is he throwing the games deliberately? The answer is no and no. Sure he might have been better, and smarter in his choice of emphasis, but U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli isn’t to blame for the tepid reception his constitutional arguments have received lately — last month in the Affordable Care Act case and this week in Arizona v. United States. Whatever the merits of his case(s), the fact is that he’s been playing to a historically tough crowd of justices, as conservative a group as we’ve seen in 75 years; an audience, for example, which rushed into this immigration case before it had to so it could express its support for states’ rights. Indeed, reading through the transcript of Wednesday’s oral argument is like sifting through the debris of an ambush. The Court’s majority clearly isn’t feeling deferential toward the federal government’s immigration policies. Some of the justices’ disdain for executive branch priorities practically dripped from their words. “It seems to me that the Federal Government just doesn’t want to know who is here illegally or not,” Chief Justice Roberts said to the Solicitor General. “So you’re saying the government has a legitimate interest in not enforcing its laws?” Justice Anthony Kennedy asked a few minutes later.”

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