Daily Border Bulletin – Immigration and the GOP Campaign in AZ, Immigrants Trickling back To AL, An In Depth Look At The Border

A New York Times Op-Ed examines how the Modern Day GOP has abandoned its past principled stands on immigration as integral to our national interest has now been caught in the grips of campaign rhetoric with little to back up their claims immigration anarchy. In the wake of a court injunction blocking parts of Alabama’s state passed immigration law immigrants have begun returning to Alabama.  A National Journal report examines how political rhetoric over undocumented immigration is disconnected from the everyday realities of life on the border.

Immigration and the GOP Campaign in AZ – A New York Times Op-Ed examines how the Modern Day GOP has abandoned its past principled stands on immigration as integral to our national interest has now been caught in the grips of campaign rhetoric with little to back up their claims. “These candidates have abandoned decades of Republican moderation on immigration, disowning views once held by Ronald Reagan, both Presidents Bush and Congressional Republicans — like Mel Martinez, Sam Brownback, Lindsey Graham and John McCain — who once led a sizable coalition for bipartisan reform but have since either left the Senate or their principles behind. Mitt Romney has moved farthest to the fringe. His scheme for fixing immigration is mass expulsion: a fantasy of ridding the country of 11 million unauthorized immigrants by making their lives unbearable. The key to his harsh vision is “self-deportation,” the deceptively bland-sounding policy that he introduced at a debate. It accepts that arresting and expelling so many millions would be impossible — like deporting the State of Ohio. But it replaces that delusion with another: That people can be made miserable enough to leave on their own.”

Immigrants Trickling back To Alabama– In the wake of a court injunction blocking parts of Alabama’s state passed immigration law immigrants have begun returning to Alabama. “Ana Jimenez and her husband were so terrified of being sent back to their native Mexico when Alabama’s tough crackdown on illegal immigrants took effect that they fled more than 2,000 miles to Los Angeles, cramming into a two-bedroom apartment with more than 20 other relatives.Now they are among the families coming back to cities like Birmingham, as the mass deportations never materialized and courts blocked parts of the law. No one knows how many people initially left the state, so it’s impossible to say how many have returned. But some illegal immigrants are trickling back, unable to find work elsewhere and missing the place that had been home for years.

An In Depth Look At The Border – A National Journal report examines how political rhetoric over undocumented immigration is disconnected from the everyday realities of life on the border.  ” The agents’ day-to-day jobs are far removed from the political battles over border security and immigration that go on in Washington and along the presidential campaign trail. The White House changed hands three years ago, and the immigration stances of some members of Congress may have helped or hurt their election prospects, but the only change that the rank-and-file Border Patrol has seen is a steady influx of resources, technical assistance, and manpower.When Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano left her job as Arizona governor in 2009 to join President Obama’s administration, she identified the Tucson sector as a top border-enforcement priority. It is the area most trafficked by smugglers along the Southwest border. In a National Journal interview last year, Napolitano said that the resources pouring into the region have “never been more extensive, and the president intends to sustain that.”

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