Daily Border Bulletin – Appeals Court Halts Deportation of 7 Immigrants, Alabama’s immigration law: Denying children food stamps, Border officials: Radio frequency cards reducing pedestrian wait

An Obama administration policy on prioritization of immigration deportations is tested when a 9th Circuit judge demanded the Obama administration explain whether the immigrants can avoid deportation because of two memos released last year by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement director John Morton.  A Los Angeles Times Op-Ed examines how Alabama’s immigration legislation is hurting children who are citizens. Finally A federal program designed to reduce wait times at the border shows some signs of success.

Appeals Court Halts Deportation of 7 Immigrants An Obama administration policy on prioritization of immigration deportations is tested when a 9th Circuit judge demanded the Obama administration explain whether the immigrants can avoid deportation because of two memos released last year by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement director John Morton. “A San Francisco-based federal appeals court is putting the Obama administration’s new immigration directive to the test by halting the deportation of seven immigrants alleged to be in the country illegally. In a 2-1 ruling on Monday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals demanded the Obama administration explain whether the immigrants can avoid deportation because of two memos released last year by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement director John Morton urging prosecutors to use “discretion” when deciding whether to pursue immigration cases. “

Alabama’s immigration law: Denying children food stamps  A Los Angeles Times Op-Ed examines how Alabama’s immigration legislation is hurting children, “Alabama’s immigration law was the focus of a recent episode of “This American Life.” For the segment, Jack Hitt traveled to Alabama shortly after HB 56 went into effect to see how the draconian law, which has been comparedto the Fugitive Slave Act, had quickly created a culture of fear and shame.

Every Latino person, legal or illegal, whom I spoke to noted at some point that there’s just something hateful in the air now. Before the law, they felt accepted. They had American friends. They didn’t feel out of place.

Now when they go to a store, every single one of them told me they feel that people are looking at them weirdly, like, what are you still doing here? When the law changed to make them less welcome, they actually became less welcome, in a day-to-day, “passing you on the street” sort of way. School kids told me they’re fighting off comments like, I’m glad you’re all moving, we don’t want you here, you take our jobs. At a pep rally, where Latinos were all sitting up front, kids started shouting, Mexicans move to the back. And most of them did.

Border officials: Radio frequency cards reducing pedestrian wait times 26 percent at crossing  A federal program designed to reduce wait times at the border shows some signs of success. “Federal officials say a pilot program designed to make it quicker for pedestrians to enter the U.S. from Mexico has reduced wait times by 26 percent at a West Texas crossing.Customs and Borders Protection spokesman Roger Maier said Friday that studies will determine whether the project at the Paso del Norte bridge expands in the U.S. The program allows frequent border crossers to apply for radio frequency cards that send information to agents while they wait. The process can trim up to 6 seconds per person.”

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Border Bulletin, Economic Story, Safety Story. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s